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"Having been schooled badly several times in a row, I learn that I like to win more than I like to lose."
-YourRoleModel


Mark4's Battle Report Writing Guide

1. Follow the basics of writing. Use good grammar, spelling, and punctuation. It's a lot more enjoyable to read a battle report where the writer takes the time to check his work over. I'm not an English major, and I don't expect many of our writers will be, but taking a few extra seconds to spell "hatchery" correctly will make your work a lot more fun for the visitors to the site to read.

2. Use paragraphs. Trying to read even the best report lumped together in one long paragraph makes my eyes hurt. I suggest writing an introductory paragraph where you set the scene, then one for the intial building period, followed by a paragraph for each significant conflict. I also put a section for the lessons I learned at the end, along with a few interesting quotes. Double spacing between paragraphs makes for an even easier reading experience.

3. Include screenshots! Ever hear "A picture is worth more than a thousand words" ? A well selected screenshot can add a lot of flavor to your story. Saying that you attacked with 24 carriers is a lot different than letting people see how you turned the screen in a mass of intereceptors.

4. Develop your own style. I like to put in sections of quotes. Maybe your style will be a quick interview with the combatants after the game. You could write down exact build orders to start your report. That little something extra is what makes people look for your reports to read the next time they visit the site.

5. Read other people's reports and learn from them. If you see someone's mistakes, you know what not to do in your report. If you see a great report, you can steal some ideas to develop your style. I recommend CattleBruiser's reports as great reading for everyone.

6. Don't bite off more than you can chew. A good report on a 7 player FFA is a lot harder than a good report on a 1v1. Work your way up to that level.

7. Have fun! This is the most important part. You want to write about an interesting and exciting game, and convey that intensity to your reader. Ask the best player you know if you can observe his/her games and write reports about them.